A Beginners Guide To Flatpak

install flatpak

3 Responses

  1. john says:

    It was my understanding that Flatpaks aren’t 100% portable. That is, that they sometimes make use of external libraries and folders (like dotFiles, configurations, etc) – thereby bleeding into the system.

    Snap files, otoh, are completely self-contained – similar to static linked binaries and/or Windows portable applications.

    I could be completely wrong here but that was my impression when I was looking up the differences between these two (and others) about a year ago. I love the idea of programs being completely self-contained – to the point of even being able to run them off a USB drive without it effecting the host OS. There may be issues with this scenario that my newbie self is unable to see clearly.

    • Frank says:

      “I could be completely wrong here”

      Yes, you’re wrong here. Flatpaks are more portable than snaps. Flatpak (unlike Snap) has very few dependencies (modern kernel, OSTree) and doesn’t rely on any complex file security system (Snap does rely on AppArmor which makes it less portable) and Flatpak apps run isolated in their own namespace (Snap apps run in the host namespace). They only depend on runtimes which are host-independent, thus don’t reduce portability.

  2. User says:

    I tried flatpak yesterday for installing a less than 1 mb application, more specifically GRadio whose deb install file has exactly only 112,9 kB.
    After going through hell figuring out how to use flatpak, I finally installed it. And right after uninstalled it all and deleted (I hope) everything that has to do with flatpak.

    So… to install a less than 1 mb app I had to install almost 800 mb (yes bigger than a cd-rom capacity) in I have no idea what, for that single tiny app to be able to be installed. I had to type (and learn) a bunch of command lines to use in the terminal…

    We are in 2018, in the era of click-and-done. I really don’t understand why things like this are still made. This was suitable for the ms-dos era, but that is long gone, like by a quarter of a century gone. And even then it would still be 800 mb too big.

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